St. John, New Brunswick, Canada

Part 1 - Reversing Falls

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There are two St. John cities in the Canadian Maritimes.
St. John, New Brunswick and St. John's, New Foundland
The one in New Brunswick does not have ('s) and is home to the Reversing Falls.

The Reversing Falls is caused by the high tide backing up the St. John River.
At low tide the river flows, through rapids, out to the Bay of Fundy.
At high tide the river reverses direction and flows, through rapids, up river.
At this point in the Bay of Fundy the tide is about 28 feet.
The tide approaches 50 feet near the north end of the Bay of Fundy.

The entrance to one of the viewing sites.

The following pictures are in pairs.
Each pair taken at almost the same spot.
The first picture is taken at high tide, the second at low tide.
Time between high and low tides is about 6 hours.
This is the St. John River, about 1 mile up stream from it's outlet in the Bay of Fundy.

Looking down on the St. John river slightly after high tide.
Notice the level and right to left flow of the water.

6 Hours later than the previous picture.
Looking down on the St. John river near low tide.
Notice the lower level and left to right flow of the water.
You can see the high water mark on the opposite bank.

Up river at a different viewing site near the waters edge.
Looking up the St. John river at near high tide.
Notice the level and flow of the water back up stream.
Those are Loones diving for fish which are riding the tide up river.
We also saw 6 or 7 harbour seals fishing.
This is a small branch of the river around the island in the background.

6 Hours later than the previous picture at almost the same spot.
Looking up the St. John river at low tide.
Notice the lower level and the flow of the water toward us.

St. John river at high tide.
The tour boat is actually stand still
The current (left to right), caused by the incomming tide, is so fast that the boat must power hard to just stand still.

6 Hours later than the previous picture at almost the same spot.
St. John river at low tide.
Notice the lower level and the right to left flow of the water.

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